jornales

for a moment of joy or moments no one pays for, i give myself a ‘jornal’. this makes me rich. try it.

My voted haiku and haiku ranked ‘with merit’ in Sketchbook 6-4 July-August 2011

Sketchbook 6-4 July-August 2011 haiku kukai ‘starry night’

Forty-one poets from 15 countries contributed 111 poems to this kukai. A kukai is a peered review poetry contest wherein a haiku Topic is assigned by the editor. An ‘anonymized’ list of submitted haiku is then distributed to all participating poets and they are invited to vote. Votes are returned to the editor who tallies the votes and publishes the haiku for the participants, this time with names and points revealed. The following haiku that placed 7th (tied with 5 others) is one of three haiku I submitted and published.

opaque windows—
we dwell on remnants
of starry nights

Haiku thread: ‘insect’

Forty-three poets from 13 countries contributed 273 poems to Sketchbook 6-7 July-August 2011 haiku thread with the kigo ‘insect’. Two of ten I submitted and published were ranked among others as’haiku with merit’ by editor John Daleiden, which he arranged into sequences under the following titles:

The Carriers (with 6 other haiku)

crossing
our invisible bridges–
army ants

Dawn to the Light (with four other poems)

summer wind–
our thoughts imitating moths
circling the light

I feel honored and delighted! I hope they, too, entertain you. But to read the more outstanding haiku in this issue, access Sketchbook 6-4 July-August 2011 on the web.

October 15, 2011 Posted by | haiku, poetry | , , , , , , | 2 Comments

my voted haiku on ‘rainbow’ (Sketchbook June 2011 haiku kukai)

under trellises
their blooming vegan romance
harvests snap peas

Sketchbook June 2011 among haiku thread editor’s choice

rainbow–
of her childhood wishes
she rephrases one

5th place Sketchbook June 2011 haiku kukai (kigo: rainbow)

wanting more
of the rainbow she takes
her kaleidoscope

9th place

so close
at her every step–
rainbow’s end

10th place (or zero vote)

Please bear with me for posting published haiku for now. Nothing fresh has worked out for me these past days. I hope some will come soon as easily as these rainbow haiku.

By the way, I can tell you why the last haiku received no vote: first, it’s author-driven or my idea imposed on it, in stead of an observation; second, it has no anchor, hence, no pivot; third, it does not leap into any thought; fourth, it’s a cliche or a rephrasing of ‘finding a dream or pot of gold at the end of the rainbow.

July 24, 2011 Posted by | haiku, poetry | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

my East Wind haiku (voted on Sketchbook’s kukai–Jan-Feb Vol 6 issue)

east wind—
his words bristling
on grain stalks

6th place

tremor
in the stones—
the east wind

7th place

storm clouds
flying on an east wind—
absent dawn

9th place
(This actually got none or zero votes though it is placed 9th among others as the editor liked it. I think the last line is abstract and doesn’t tie-in with the the first two lines. Perhaps ‘waiting for a hawk’ or ‘a hawk swoops down’ would have made it more concrete.)

I wrote these haiku with my being transported to the Philippines. Vancouver light on my window that morning I composed them washed the colors of trees, leaves and stones with the blankness of snow. The freeze bristled frosted twigs but in my heart, the East Wind blew a bristling steam of foreboding quite palpable at the onset of the dry and hot season (the other season of the two we have is wet) about the time of Easter, or Spring in the western hemisphere. From that memory, I wrote the haiku.

What is the East Wind?

The east wind from Wikipedia:

“An east wind is a wind that originates in the east and blows west. In Greek mythology, Eurus, the east wind, was the only wind not associated with any of the three Greek seasons, and is the only one of these four Anemoi not mentioned in Hesiod’s Theogony or in the Orphic Hymns.

In Hans Christian Andersen’s fairy tale The Garden of Paradise, it is the East Wind who takes the hero to visit the eponymous garden. In J. R. R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings, the East Wind, like most other things dealing with the east, is viewed as a thing of evil. In Book III (which appears in The Two Towers), after Aragorn and Legolas have sung a lament for Boromir involving invocations of the other three winds, the following dialogue takes place:

“‘You left the East Wind to me,’ said Gimli, ‘but I will say naught of it.’

‘That is as it should be,” said Aragorn. ‘In Minas Tirith they endure the East Wind, but they do not ask it for tidings. …’ ”
In George MacDonald’s At the Back of the North Wind, on the other hand, the East Wind is described as more mischievous than strictly evil; the North Wind comments, “…[O]ne does not exactly know how much to believe of what she says, for she is very naughty sometimes…”

Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes story “His Last Bow”, published in 1917 but set in 1914, ends with Holmes addressing his assistant Doctor Watson on the eve of the First World War… The same speech was used at the end of the 1942 Basil Rathbone Holmes film Sherlock Holmes and the Voice of Terror, this time in reference to the Second World War…”

March 24, 2011 Posted by | background, haiku, poetry | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment