jornales

for a moment of joy or moments no one pays for, i give myself a ‘jornal’. this makes me rich. try it.

Doves (a haibun for One Shot Wednesday)

The dove pair stopped cooing today.

Last time I glimpsed them, each moved listless in the cage – tails fanning each other’s snow head, red eyes spying mine. No one could come near. Each guarded the other like furious sentries. Could they have known they made such a handsome pair?

The white pair would not leave the dovecote. I caught them glance the brown too common flock; and then they turned away, lidless red eyes back to each other.

all I can see
what I cannot see
in your eyes

The white doves were at a wedding today cooped up, as perhaps they would have wished in a bell. When the newlyweds tugged at a string, the doves fell together – confused by the crowd, helpless in the grasp of the bride and groom. When tossed up again, their wings seemed weak. For the first time, they flew away from each other each clutching at light cords hung from the ceiling of the room where a wedding party was rising to a pitch. Their webbed feet quivered uncertain of their hold, their eyes redder, blinking with fear; they trembled as if they had lost their wings.

Now the crowd worked at a game with the white pair as pawns. Whoever caught one of the pair would think it a prize. What a prize–the glee bubbled off their laughter. The crowd did not know; how could they?

riddle:
when do heartbeats rhyme
in what beat end?

In freedom, a gaping cave awaits to trap lovers or a mess of strings. For the doves, loss of the other is sorrow that stones a tiny heart.

Copyright (c) by Alegria Imperial 2011

Posted for One Shot Wednesday at One Stop Poetry, the inimitable gathering place for poets and artists. Check us out.

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April 26, 2011 - Posted by | haibun, poetry, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

2 Comments

  1. This is an incredibly inventive uses of prose and short stanzas. A haibun. I don’t know much about this form, but you it works really well with the nature and wedding party imagery.

    Comment by dustus | April 27, 2011

    • Thank you, Adam! Yes, Japanese poetry forms are incredibly simple yet challenging. Haibun combines haiku and/tanka with text. Putting it simply, or to my understanding, it’s a journal (the text in objective writing) juxtaposed with a haiku or tanka. Together a writer lends a ‘whole universe of seeing’ from Nature as is often unseen. I’m still learning and I know it will take me years before I can say I have mastered the art. Sometimes though, I ‘get it’ and then, I slip back to not ‘getting it’. And that’s the thrill of writing all three genres! Thanks again for your vote on this!

      Comment by alee9 | April 28, 2011


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